Dec 28

Cherry Sauce

Cherry Sauce (Warrior)

1/2 cup dried cherries
1 cup water
1/2 cup cherry juice concentrate
2 tsp cornstarch
1/4 cup water

In a small sauce pan combine cherries, water and juice. Bring to a boil and turn down to low. Simmer until cherries are reconstituted and plump. Stir cornstarch into 1/4 cup of water. Pour slowly into cherry mixture, stirring constantly. Mixture will become thick and clear. Simmer an additional 5 minutes. Serve over hot cereal.

Makes 4 1/4-cup servings.

Dec 22

Cravings

Food Cravings

A food craving is more than a preference for particular foods, or an impulse to buy certain snacks. A food craving is an insistent desire for a type of food (eg. candy, pizza) which we often go to some lengths to satisfy.  Cravings can be detrimental for our dietary goals! Fortunately, with a little forethought and planning, it is not too difficult to curb our craving desires.

What causes food cravings?

Cravings are usually more psychological than physical. The most common emotional or psychological triggers for food cravings are stress, depression, boredom or a general need for comfort.  Changes in hormone levels (such as during PMS), or low or imbalanced blood sugar levels can also cause cravings.

How can I avoid cravings?

  1. Eat small, frequent meals. When you get hungry between meals, enjoy a healthy snack.
  2. Reduce your intake of sugar and salt since overconsumption of these foods can aggravate cravings.
  3. Drink water instead of searching for a snack.   Oftentimes, we confuse thirst with hunger.
  4. Food cravings are satisfied best by the actual substance that is craved.  Forget eating carrot sticks to satify your craving for ice cream.  Instead have a reasonable portion of ice cream.  In moderation, favorite high-calorie foods can help you stay within a well-balanced diet and achieve a healthy weight.”
Dec 22

Clean Greens

Clean Greens

Millions of us eat spinach and lettuce safely every day, so our chances of getting E.coli poisoning are small.  But with the recent outbreak of tainted spinach, we naturally feel more cautious when it comes to eating our leafy greens.

Here are a few tips to lower your chances of getting sick.

  • Wash your hands before you open the bag. It really is important.
  • Be careful not to allow either the bag or the salad to come close to raw meat juices (they might contain E.coli or other bad bacteria).
  • Before you buy, take a look at that sell by date and don’t buy the salad if that date has passed.
  • If the salad stays out too long (gets too warm) at home or starts to look brown or gooey around the edges — don’t try to save it, throw it away.
  • And if you do get sick, think salad! It might be the culprit…and if there is any of the salad left in the bag, don’t throw it away. (The salad may need to be tested.)
  • If you get really sick, sick enough to go to the hospital, let the doctors know you had salad in a bag. And if you find out you are contaminated with E.coli, call your local health department so someone else doesn’t get sick.
Dec 22

Cholesterol

Know your cholesterol levels

19% of Americans ages 20 to 74 have high cholesterol levels.  Are you one of them?

How do I get checked?

Your doctor can conduct a simple, inexpensive test to determine your cholesterol level.  When the test results are back your total blood cholesterol will fall into one of these categories:

Desirable — Less than 200 mg/dL
Borderline high risk — 200–239 mg/dL
High risk — 240 mg/dL and over

How often should I be checked?

Young Adults should be checked once every five years. Men over 45 and women over 55 should measure their cholesterol levels at least once a year.

Keeping tabs on your numbers can go a long way in preventing a number of serious medical complications (heart attacks and strokes included).

Dec 22

Cereal

Smart eating by the bowl!

Nutritionists never recommend that you live on one dish alone, but if they had to pick one, whole-grain cereal and milk would be it. Whole-grain cereals are packed with fiber, nutrients and protein. Be sure to check the nutrition panel of your favorite cereal to find out if it is a ‘green light’ cereal. To help get you started here is a list of some of the best.

Barbara’s Shredded
spoonfuls
Serving Size: 3/4 cup
Calories: 120
Fat: 1.5 g
Protein: 4 g
Fiber: 4 g
Sugar: 5 g

Post
Grape-Nuts
Serving Size: 1/2 cup
Calories: 200
Fat: 1g
Protein: 7 g
Fiber: 6g
Sugar: 5 g

Cheerios
Serving Size: 1 cup
Calories: 110
Fat: 2 g
Protein: 3g
Fiber: 3g
Sugar: 1 g

Post Shredded
Wheat
Serving Size: 1 cup
Calories: 170
Fat: 1 g
Protein: 6 g
Fiber: 6 g
Sugar: 0 g

Quaker
Oatmeal Squares
Serving Size: 1 cup
Calories: 210
Fat: 2.5 g
Protein: 6 g
Fiber: 4 g
Sugar: 9 g

Kashi
Go Lean
Serving Size: 1 cup
Calories: 140
Fat: 1 g
Protein: 13 g
Fiber: 10 g
Sugar: 6 g

Kellogg’s Complete
Oat Bran Flakes
Serving Size: 3/4 cup
Calories: 110
Fat: 1g
Protein: 3 g
Fiber: 4 g
Sugar: 6 g

Wheat Chex
Serving Size: 3/4 cup
Calories: 160
Fat: 1 g
Protein: 5 g
Fiber: 5 g
Sugar: 5 g

Cereal is a great way to start your day, but you can also use it as a nutritious snack or recipe ingredient. You can make your own trail mix with whole-grain cereal, nuts and dried fruit. Or use it as a coating for chicken, in your favorite cookie batter, or as a substitute in a muffin mix.

Dec 22

Canned, Frozen or Fresh

Which is Best? Canned, Frozen or Fresh?

Many people believe that unless produce is raw, it’s nutritional value is deleted. Yes, it’s true that fresh fruits and vegetables are most nutritious and best tasting when they are picked at their peak. Plus, fruit and vegetable lovers usually prefer the superior taste, texture and look of fresh produce. However, don’t under-estimate the nutritional value of produce prepared in other ways. Consider this….

  • Some vegetables become MORE nutritious when cooked.(It is better to steam most vegetables than to cook them for long periods of time at high temperatures.)
  • Canned produce is usually processed immediately after harvest, when nutrient content is at its peak. Some canned produce can be high in sodium and/or sugar, however, check the nutrition labels for low sodium and low sugar versions of products.
  • Few preservatives are used in frozen foods. Frozen foods are nutritious because most nutrients are retained during the process. Soon after being picked, the foods are quickly blanched in water and then frozen. This helps to preserve freshness.

A message nutritionists have long emphasized is this: canned and frozen produce is a nutritionally sound alternative to fresh fruits and veggies. Frozen and canned products are particularly good to have on hand for times when you can’t get to the store for fresh products or
when fresh fruits and vegetables are out of season or out of your price range.

The bottom line is still EAT MORE FRUITS AND VEGGIES. Canned, frozen, fresh or slightly cooked, they are a good thing!

Dec 22

Eat Your Water

Summertime heat and playing outdoors increases your bodies need for water. It can be hard to get your 8-12 glasses a day, especially if you don’t like the taste of your water or you’d rather reach for your soda.  Here are some fun ways to add more H2O to your diet.

 If you don’t like to drink plain water, eating more watery foods is a good strategy. During the  summer eat foods like melons, plums, and peaches to help increase your water intake.

Freeze 100% fruit juice and bits of real fruit in ice cube trays and add them to water.

If you’re trying to drink more, consider upping your water intake gradually.  Try increasing one cup at a time to allow your body to adjust. Otherwise you may feel waterlogged and will be running to the bathroom every 15 minutes.

Dec 22

Activities and Calories Burned

Find an Exercise Program That Works For You!




Everybody has exercising preferences, but how effective are they, and will you really get results.

Next to each activity is the estimated calories you will burn every 30 minutes. Remember to increase gradually, and make your fitness routines fun and enjoyable!

Basketball: 366.0 cal

Bicycling: 273.0 cal

Boxing: 366.0 cal

Cross-Country Skiing: 379.0 cal

Downhill Skiing:295.0 cal

Field Hockey: 356.0 cal

Free Weights: 227.0 cal

Heavy Gardening: 333.0 cal

Hiking: 322.0 cal

Ice Skating: 308.0 cal

Ice/Roller Hockey: 424.0 cal

Kayaking: 273.0 cal

Lacrosse: 356.0 cal

Martial Arts: 519.0 cal

Mountain Biking: 450.0 cal

Racquetball: 471.0 cal

Raking Leaves: 143.0 cal

Rock Climbing: 422.0 cal

Rowing: 339.0 cal

Rugby: 349.0 cal

Scuba Diving: 451.0 cal

Snowboarding: 260.0 cal

Snowshoeing: 441.0 cal

Soccer: 363.0 cal

Stacking Wood: 233.0 cal

Surfing/Body Boarding: 215.0 cal

Swimming: 414.0 cal

Tennis: 289.0 cal

Volleyball: 133.0 cal

Water Aerobics: 165.0 cal

Water Polo: 373.0 cal

Dec 22

10 Ways to Make You Look and Feel Better

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Ten Ways to Make You Look and Feel Better!

  1.  Make up your mind. Decide you are going to change. Partial commitment will yield partial results. Consistency is the key.
  2. Think before you eat. Assess what you are considering to eat. Ask yourself, “Will eating this get me closer to my goal?” If not, make a better choice.
  3. Eating for pleasure is distinctly a human experience. Choose foods on nutritional value not simply taste.
  4. Food choices are a habit. Replace poor choices with good ones, and it will become a new habit. It is simple, bad food make you feel bad, and healthy food make you feel good.
  5. Do not buy junk food. Similar to #4, omitting these foods at home will make a huge difference. If they are not around you won’t eat them.
  6. DO NOT SKIP MEALS! Te key is to keep you body’s metabolism burning all day. Food is your fuel. Skipping meals will lead to a decline in your metabolism.
  7. Listen to your body. When you are hungry eat. Stop when you are comfortable, not when you are stuffed.
  8. Be honest with yourself. Half a cookie still contains calories. Little bites throughout the day add up to a meal. Everything counts, so count it!
  9. Weigh and measure food for a week. This may be inconvenient, but can be very valuable in educating oneself about nutrition.
  10. You have to move. Incorporate more movement into your daily routine. Park further away at work or at the store. Use the stairs, or start to exercise. Do not take the path of least resistance. It will pay off. And remember, BE CONSISTENT!




Dec 22

7 Ways to Win the Desk Diet

7 Ways to Win the Desk Diet

DESK-JOB DIETERS HAVE A COMMON CONCERN:  HOW AM I SUPPOSED TO LOSE WEIGHT WHEN IʼM SITTING IN FRONT OF A COMPUTER ALL DAY?

This can be a big problem for many individuals.  Proper nutrition is key in losing or maintain­ing weight with a sedentary, working lifestyle.  Weight control is a simple equation in nutrition terms.  Calories in = Calories out.  If calories in is greater than calories out you will gain weight, and vice versa.  Here are some simple suggestions to help win the desk diet battle.

Snack wisely.  A lot of individuals tend to snack while working on the computer or watching television.  If you are one of those people, keep healthy snacks available at all times.

Drink Up.  Keep water at your desk.  Water quells the appetite, and it is healthy for you.

Plan Lunch.  Do not skip meals.  Cravings tend to creep up on us when we forget to eat regular meals.

Move.  Moving at least 10-15 minutes per day at an elevated heart rate is a great start.  Use the stairs, park at the far end of parking lots, or walk to lunch.  The key to moving is to move, start today!

Exercise dur­ing off hours.  If you live close to work, try walking or riding a bike.  Exercise at home or a fitness club in the morning or just after work.

Find Help With friends.  Everyone has heard that “ Two Heads Are Better Than One.”  This saying goes for exercising as well.  Fitness can be a lot of fun when you involve others around you.  Get a coworker active or take your spouse or children to the gym with you.

Use Your Tools.  This means to be creative.  Trade in your work chair for a fitness ball  This will do wonders for your posture.  We cannot carry a treadmill or weights around with us to use anytime, so give yourself options.  Research exercising tips while on your computer, plan your meals each day, get encouragement from those you work with and your family.  Most importantly, make a com­mitment.  Changing your lifestyle is not easy, but living a high energy lifestyle is worth all the work.  Do not forget to reward yourself.  Good luck, remember to have fun and enjoy life.